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Technical Information

Wine Blend Vine Age Soil Type Vineyard Area*
Vermentino Riviera Ligure di Ponente
Vigneto Isasco
Vermentino Planted in 1950, 1990, 1996, 2016 Red Clay, Gravel 1.5 ha
Pigato Riviera Ligure di Ponente
Vigneto Ca’ da Rena
Pigato Planted in 1973-74, 1990 Rocky Red Clay 2 ha
Mataòssu Colline Savonesi
Vigneto Reiné
Mataòssu Planted in 1930 Silt .9 ha
Lumassina Colline Savonesi
Lumassina Planted in 1980, 1999 Silt 1 ha
Lumassina Colline Savonesi Frizzante
Lumassina Planted in 1980, 1999 Silt 1 ha
Mataòssu Colline Savonesi Spumante Brut
Mataòssu Planted in 1986 Rocky Red Clay .8 ha
Colline Savonesi Frizzante “Pettirosso”
50% Rossese, 50% Crovino Rossesse planted in 1984, 1999; Crovino planted in 1950, 1984, 1999 Red Clay; Rocky Clay 1 ha; .2 ha
Barbarossa Colline Savonesi
Barbarossa Planted in 1996 Gravel .6 ha
Rossese Riviera Ligure di Ponente
Vigneto Isasco
Rossese Planted in 1984, 1999 Red Clay 1.1 ha
Cruvin Colline Savonesi
Crovino Planted in 1950, 1984, 1999 Sandy Gravel .8 ha
* "ha" = hectares; one hectare equals roughly two and a half acres

VITICULTURE / VINIFICATION

• The terraced vineyards are at 100-300 m altitude and within 1.2 km of the sea

• All vinification in stainless steel

• No machines are used for pumping over; the pressure resulting from the release of gas during fermentation is used instead

• Wines are neither filtered nor fined


Vermentino, Pigato, Mataòssu, Lumassina:

• Wines spend four months on the lees (Lumassina 3 months)

• Generally no malolactic fermentation, depending on the conditions (esp. acidity level) of each vintage


Lumassina Frizzante:

• Closed-vat alcoholic fermentation traps bubbles to create a frizzante wine; no second fermentation

• Generally no malolactic fermentation, depending on the conditions (esp. acidity level) of each vintage

• Wines spend two months on the lees


“Pettirosso” Frizzante:

• Juice is obtained by saignée

• Closed-vat alcoholic fermentation traps bubbles to create a frizzante wine; no second fermentation

• Rossese and Corvine are co-fermented

• Maceration lasts 8-10 hours

• Wines spend four months on the lees


Mataòssu Spumante Brut:

• Second (sparkling) fermentation occurs in bottle

• Malolactic fermentation

• Wines spend eight to ten months on the lees with weekly batonnage


Rossese, Cruvin:

• Maceration lasts 15 days

• Wines spend four months on the lees


Barbarossa:
• Rosé wine made from saignée
• Maceration lasts 10 days
• Wines spend four months on the lees

MISCELLANEA

Red Clay:

The rocks in Varigotti have an unusually high aluminum content; as the rock breaks down the aluminum is released and washes into the clay soil, where over several years it oxidizes and turns red. This soil is found only in Varigotti and certain areas of Provence (which is just a few hours away by car).


Mataòssu:

The native Mataòssu (pronounced mah-tah-OHSS-soo) dominated the vineyards of Varigotti in the 19th century, but its delicate vegetative balance provoked most winegrowers to rip out the vines in favor of less finicky grapes. Today only three producers have wines labeled Mataòssu, and the Ruffinos assure us that the other two are actually Lumassina.


Lumassina:

The native Lumassina (loo-mahss-SEE-nah) is a cousin of Mataòssu and has a similarly difficult vegetative balance. Punta Crena’s still bottling has a snail on the label because the grape ripens very slowly (it is also a pun on the name Lumassina, which resembles the Italian word for snail, “lumaca”).


Cruvin:

Cruvin (croo-VEEN) is another fussy native grape that gives tiny yields, so the Ruffinos are the only family now producing it. The name Cruvin means “to fall” in local dialect because the grape easily falls off the vine when it is ripe. The fox on the label is sitting under the vine waiting for the grapes to ripen….


Vermentino & Pigato:

Pigato is a genetic variation of Vermentino that developed around the 18th century and was probably named for its pighe—“freckles” in the local dialect, referring to its spotty skin. Today the two varieties are often confused because they are frequently planted together and cross-pollinate in the vineyards, but the difference is evident when they are kept separate, as at Punta Crena. In order to demonstrate this distinction scientifically the Ruffinos are planning to provide cuttings of their own vines to a local university for comparative genetic testing.


Barbarossa:

This is yet another unique wine since it is the only Barbarossa produced in Italy (although a distinct grape variety grown in Emilia-Romagna coincidentally has the same name). The grape is quite pale (as seen on the label) and gives a rosé wine even after a full 15-day maceration.

General Information

Country
Italy
Region
Liguria
Appellation(s)
Riviera Ligure di Ponente, Colline Savonesi
Producer
Tommaso Ruffino & Family
Founded
1500
Annual Production
4,200 cases
Farming
Traditional
Website
http://www.puntacrena.it
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